Opening Hours : Monday to Friday - 9am to 5pm
  Contact : (03) 9871 4788

What are the opening hours of Bond Street Gastroenterology?

The office is attended by our friendly, helpful staff who are available to contact Monday through Friday, 9.00am – 5.00pm.

How much will procedures and consultations that are organized via Bond Street Gastroenterology cost?

We endeavour to keep our fees as fair and reasonable as possible. 

For those requiring a procedure (eg gastroscopy or colonoscopy) and who have private health insurance, we have agreements with almost all of the major health funds and you will not incur any out-of-pocket costs. Regarding the hospital bed/theatre costs, this will depend on what level of cover you have and whether you have an excess on your insurance policy with your health fund. A few of the anaesthetists we use may charge a small out-of-pocket fee – we can provide the contact details for the scheduled anaesthetist’s rooms to clarify this prior to your booking.

For patients without private health insurance, procedures can be arranged in the public system at Maroondah Hospital at no cost, but much longer waiting periods should be expected. Another option is to pay for the procedure’s full out-of-pocket cost at either Ringwood Private or Glen Iris Private Hospitals – fees are available upon request.

For consultations at Bond Street Gastroenterology there is generally an out-of-pocket cost for initial consultations of approximately $50-70 depending on time and complexity, then for further review consultations the cost is approximately $30 (NB correct at time of writing, subject to change). Fees are discounted for pensioners and concession card holders.

I am having a procedure. When/why do I need to fast beforehand?

You must fast for 6 hours before your procedure. This ensures that your stomach is empty and thus any food or fluid previously in your stomach does not cause choking or aspiration when you are sedated. Fasting means no food or fluids/ water at all.

I am having a procedure. What do I do about my medications?

Blood pressure tablets can be taken on the morning of the procedure with a small sip of water (<20ml). Asthma medications should be taken as usual (bring them along to the hospital too). Most other medications can be taken after the procedure is completed.

Please also refer to the special instructions for certain medications listed below.

What about diabetic medications?

If you are on tablets for diabetes, then do not take them on the evening prior to, or on the morning of your procedure. You only risk running a slightly higher blood sugar this way, which is quite safe when only for a short period. 

If you take insulin for your diabetes, then please discuss appropriate management of this before and after your procedure with your referring doctor, or alternatively make an appointment to discuss this before the procedure with the endoscopist at bond street gastroenterology.

What about Warfarin?

Warfarin can also be quite dangerous to stop, depending on why you are taking it. If it is safe to stop it, then you should miss four days of warfarin dosing before your procedure. You should discuss this with your referring doctor or organize a consultation at bond street gastroenterology prior to your procedure to work this out in a safe manner.

What about newer anticoagulants (eg dabigatran (Pradaxa), rivaroxaban (Xarelto) and apixaban (Eliquis)?

Again these can be dangerous to stop. If it is safe to stop, then you should miss three days of these drugs before your procedure. You should discuss this with your referring doctor or organize a consultation at Bond Street Gastroenterology prior to your procedure to work this out in a safe manner.

What about aspirin?

Aspirin can usually be taken as normal but you don’t need to take it on the day of the procedure. If a decision is made to stop aspirin, you should stop it 7 days before the procedure.

What about other antiplatelets (blood thinning drugs) like Plavix/Iscover/Brilinta etc?

These medications can be dangerous to stop, depending on why they were given in the first place. You should discuss this with your referring doctor or organize a consultation at Bond Street Gastroenterology prior to your procedure to work this out. If it is safe to stop them, then they should be ceased for 7 days before your procedure.  If you have your procedure while these drugs are still in your system, the risk of bleeding complications is much higher. You should resume these medications straight after the procedure, unless told otherwise by the endoscopist.